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Microtech Troodon Tactical Knife

I searched all over the internet until I found the brand. It was a Microtech Halo Knife. Microtech is a US based knife manufacturer with an obsession for quality. Just before plunking down around $300 for a Halo I came across another model: the Troodon.

The Troodon has a slightly smaller blade, but the real difference is in the mechanism. The Halo requires a button press to extend the blade, but to retract it one must use two hands to pull back part of the handle of the knife. It's hard to explain, but the important factor is that it can't be retracted with one hand. The Troodon uses a flick switch on the side of the knife. Pressing it forward causes the blade to extend straight out, but pulling it back causes it to snap back inside with a satisfying click noise. Here's a video:

Cool, huh? I ordered the black on black Troodon and couldn't possibly be happier with it. The fit and finish are all top notch and simply holding the knife gives the impression that it's perfectly built. It was harder than I expected to move the switch, but a bit of practice makes it easy. I haven't done much with it other than open packages, but boy does it open those packages with style.

Not Being a Robot

One of my overarching goals in how I present myself is to be consistent. Although the relationships I have with my family, friends, acquaintances, and random people on the internet is always going to be different, I try to be the same person with all of those groups. I think authenticity is important, and this consistency is a sign of authenticity.

Try as I might, though, people who read my stuff online and then meet me in person are consistently surprised that I'm actually a happy guy who jokes around a lot and is more human than robot. I see why people expect me to be different, though. My writing tends to be serious and I'm always talking about habits or rules or working hard.

Although all of this rigidity is a big part of my life, it's also just the foundation. From the rigid parts of my life I'm able to get a tremendous amount of work done, keep myself healthy, and move towards my goals. But there's also a lot that it can't do. Rigidity doesn't build relationships or spark creativity, two important parts of life.

I think you learn a lot about someone when you see what he does when there's nothing he has to do. And I think by changing what you do when you have nothing to do, you can change what sort of person you are. I design my life to have as few as possible externally-dictated things that I absolutely have to do, and I create systems to fill that void. Every day I have sixteen hours ahead of me, and no one to tell me what to do in that time except myself.

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