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Living in an RV : Day 10

I've lived in my RV for 10 days now. I have only gone back to the condo to get clothes, and to sleep one night (basically I picked a loud parking spot that was 10 feet from the condo and it was 5am so I just went inside instead of driving to a quiet spot). A lot of things have panned out as expected, but there have also been some big surprises.

I could go on and on, but you probably get the idea. I totally love living in this RV. It's a great feeling to drive over to my mom's house and have her say "Oh, you didn't happen to bring those tickets, did you?" and to just be able to walk into my house and get them.

My parents are really into the RV thing, which is funny. They're always a bit skeptical about my schemes. My dad helped me take out the CRT TV and the Microwave which I replaced with a flat panel and a flash bake oven. My mom made me nice curtains. I'm trying hard to resist the urge to totally trick out the RV. The carpet smells a bit musty so I might put in granite tile or bamboo floors. I think that would be neat.

What to do with too much biogas.

On Green Thinking

At a recent show on small-scale power, I saw an interesting display of a domestic biogas generator, ideal for installing in suburban household. It's a good deal: garden waste in, three plate-hours of gas per day out, and it couples to the sewerage system so there's no maintenance. Good so far.

But then I asked the question, "what happens when you're not using the three hours of gas?" The answer is that excess gas simply vents into the sewers.

Now this is not a good solution. Biogas/sewer gas is methane, and although this methane gas in not a fossil fuel, it is still methane, with 25 times the global warming capacity of carbon dioxide. It is not something that is responsible to vent into the atmosphere. So on the one hand one can displace a fossil fuel with a biofuel, but the spillage of that biofuel leads to increased global warming.

Biogas is used, in places, to generate electricity. One can make money out of this, by capturing methane, say from a landfill, and burning it in an engine that spins a generator and sell the electricity and the carbon credits.

But the engine one uses to spin the generator is a heat engine, and immediately two thirds of the energy is lost as heat. Some methane now will not be vented into the atmosphere, which is good, but it does represent a lost opportunity: more fossil electricity could have been displaced by the biogas. Additionally, generators are expensive, require a lot of maintenance and are more inefficient the smaller they are. It would hardly be worth anyone's while to run one at home.

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