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Every Day is Equal

Yesterday was Christmas. I spent it in New Jersey with my parents, sister, aunt, uncle, and three of my cousins. We played board games (Scattergories!), ate Christmas dinner together, and I "helped" my cousins play with their new toys they got for Christmas.

And then, in between those events, I did two hours of Japanese practice and also spent time writing content for Life Nomadic.

I have a lot of good habits as well as a lot of bad habits, but one of my best is that I treat every day equally.

Want to get more out of life? Look to video games for inspiration

On SEBASTIAN MARSHALL

Question from a reader -

Kaizan (I believe this was the word encapsulating the concept that small but regular efforts both build momentum and create a larger effect)

You seem to have some of the best discipline and commitment I've seen in anyone. Quite frankly I have the toughest time fighting the urgency of the present for the promised windfalls of the future. Are there any tips you have for effectively depriving oneself now for greater long-term success? If you feel as though each small effort has no measurable impact, beyond the short-term perceived negative effects, how do you justify and reason that the long-term positive effects will come. E.g. how do you say "no I can't drink this coffee with milk in it because I'm avoiding carbs" or "I can't buy this interesting book because I'm trying to save" when the correlation between those individual events and the desired result (weight-control/savings) is unmeasurable?

I'm not sure the exact year, but somewhere around 2008 to 2010 I started thinking about why video games are so easy for people to get engaged in.

When you look at it objectively, a lot of video games are more difficult, more time-consuming, and more tedious than getting large real life successes.

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