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NEWSFLASH: Karaoke with me Tonight!

A year ago there was something called "Krunkaoke" every wednesday night at a club nearby. I went religiously and became one of the few creepy superstar regulars who dropped hot gangsta classics every Wednesday. The first time I went I was really nervous, but after doing "How We Do" by The Game, I was hooked. Eventually Krunkaoke became too packed (is that possible?), and they cancelled it!

Desperate for a Karaoke fix, I started going to Rain, which is a gay club a couple blocks from where I live. They had a cool light up stage, but the mediocre sound system and guys trying to grab my ass left me looking for alternatives.

Then one night it happened. I was working late and I thought I heard bad singing at the club downstairs. Could it be... Karaoke?

Are Writers Inherently Lonely?

On Imported Blog

Last semester, one of the parts of my Literature class's curriculum was to do an in-depth analysis of multiple Seamus Heaney poems. For a little background, Seamus Heaney is an Irish poet famous of poems such as "Death of a Naturalist." He passed away last year.

A majority of his poems that we studied centered around one theme: childhood. He talked about his experiences as a kid, and he used a tone of nostalgia, implying that he wanted to go back. It frustrated me that he mainly talked about this topic.

In my eyes, his life was divided into two parts. The first, his childhood, was spent having all these amazing experiences that shaped his life. The second, his adulthood, was spent writing about his childhood.

To me, all he wanted to do was to go back. I felt as if he didn't enjoy his current life (adulthood) and reminiscing about his past was his way of coping. Now yes this is most likely an overgeneralization, but it made me think of this question:

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