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NEWSFLASH: Karaoke with me Tonight!

A year ago there was something called "Krunkaoke" every wednesday night at a club nearby. I went religiously and became one of the few creepy superstar regulars who dropped hot gangsta classics every Wednesday. The first time I went I was really nervous, but after doing "How We Do" by The Game, I was hooked. Eventually Krunkaoke became too packed (is that possible?), and they cancelled it!

Desperate for a Karaoke fix, I started going to Rain, which is a gay club a couple blocks from where I live. They had a cool light up stage, but the mediocre sound system and guys trying to grab my ass left me looking for alternatives.

Then one night it happened. I was working late and I thought I heard bad singing at the club downstairs. Could it be... Karaoke?

Video of the Week: Never Is a Promise

On Where Pianos Roam

There happens to be one song in the world that served as a catalyst for me to pursue music as an on-going passion.  Several years ago, a friend of mine had told me of a new artist named Fiona Apple.  She mentioned that I might like her stuff and recommended that I check her out. Well, a few weeks later, I was in a record store and came across one of those listening booth/kiosks that had several different CD's that you could hear songs from.  Fiona Apple's debut album called "Tidal", with those gargantuan blue eyes staring out at  you, was one of them .  .  .

I remember picking up a copy and thinking "Oh, this is that girl that my friend told me about".  After looking throught the song titles in the back of it, one title stood out to me.  It was number 7--a song called "Never Is a Promise".  I thought it was such a simple but poetically provocative name for a song.

In the middle of this very busy record store, I put the headphones on, went to #7, and was hopeful that I would like what I would hear.  I can honestly say that this event changed the way I looked at music.  I heard this song with all of its power, hopeful defiance, angst, and beauty, and I was so inspired.  I could relate to every word and understand every nuance in the music.   The delicate inflections in her voice, the sense of mounting urgency in the piano, the mournful violins, and that tender moment at the end when she sings "You'll say I need appeasing when I start to cry"--I was never the same after this.  This song changed me in ways that I can't even begin to explain.

Every now and then, I actually play this song on the piano and sing it when I'm alone in my room.   I just love to play it so much.

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