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How to Get a Month's Worth of Work Done in One Week

The average employee does somewhere between 1.5 to 5 hours af actual work per day, depending on whose survey you trust. Let's say people do three hours of actual focused work. That's sixty hours of actual work per month.

If you're in a boring job and you're content to dick around and waste time, that's fine. But if your future actually depends on your output, you need to do better.

For the past six weeks I've averaged over ten hours a day of quality work, seven days a week. This is the longest period of time I've sustained this high a level of productivity, and I've found that the method of achieving it is extremely simple. Here's my method.

Sometimes It's Better Not to Know

I'm sitting in the Kansas City terminal, waiting for my next flight. The barbecue restaurant there serves shockingly large portions, which, combined with waking up early today, has me feeling sleepy.

I should work, I think. My eyes are half closed, though, and I can't imagine thinking through tough problems like the one waiting for me on Sett. I think about writing a blog post, but my past few days have been weak, so I want to be awake and do a good one. I think about doing some basic todo list stuff, but I'm already losing concentration after the first google search.

Okay, but if I'm not going to work, what am I going to do? The answer turns out to be downloading an episode of Restaurant Stakeout. I'm not proud to write that sentence.

I think I've seen about two episodes of that show. The first I saw at my aunt and uncle's house. Not knowing anything about the restaurant business, I found it really fascinating. Then I was on some red-eye flight and I saw an episode on the in-filght entertainment system.

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