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Conservation of Decisions

The way we make decisions is pretty interesting. Making decisions that are bad for us is easy and effortless. Think about how easy it is to decide to watch TV, eat some junk food, take a nap, and then play some video games. On the other hand, let's say that today you wanted to have a really positive day. To actually decide and convince yourself to prepare and eat healthy food, avoid watching any TV, power through your work even when you're feeling tired, and avoid wasting time on facebook is hard. Not impossible, of course, but just by thinking through these two scenarios, you can imagine how much more mentally taxing the latter is.

The trick to overcoming this is to make decisions once that will have an effect for a long period of time-- in other words, having a standard routine that allows for no variance. For example, I want to have a good sleep schedule. I can do what I tried to do for about 30 years, which is will myself to make a good decision on when to go to bed every night, which didn't work at all, or just say that computer is off at midnight no matter what, and I'm asleep by two no matter what. Now I don't get to make a decision every night-- I just turn of the computer, read, and go to sleep. All I had to do was make this decision once, and then train myself on it for a couple weeks before it became second nature.

Another huge benefit of rigid scheduling is that the schedules can be tweaked. I wanted to eat more Omega 3 fats. How do I do that? Well, if I just know that's a goal, maybe I'll go grocery shopping and figure out which foods are better, figure out how to prepare them, and make them. Or maybe I'll just dial it in by eating a couple more walnuts here and there and order salmon on the rare occasion I go to a restaurant. In my case, switching to eat more Omega 3 was simple-- I eat the same thing for lunch every day, so I just substituted a sardine sandwich and tuna sandwich for my nut/fruit sandwiches. One decision and my whole diet is improved.

Studies have shown that willpower is like a muscle. On one hand it needs to be exercised regularly to be effective, but on the other hand it's strength can become depleted through short-term overuse. If you're trying to eat healthy, exercise, work effectively, write, be financially responsible, and sleep well through micro-management, you probably won't be able to continue indefinitely. Instead you'll have a burst of a week or two where you crush it, and then you'll deplete your willpower and regress back to old habits.

Bitcoin: What people aren't understanding

On Ideas in the Making

Bitcoin has arguably one of the innovations that has led to the highest amount of skepticism in a while. The systems, technology, and rules the bitcoin system has have never been unified in such a way ever before, and possibly have never been possible, or at least as feasible, as ever before in history due to limitations in memory, computation, cryptological effectiveness and internet speed. It is important to remember there are two parts to bitcoin the underlying protocol and what is applicable to said protocol. The underlying protocol, which can be understood to be a decentralized consensus network that uses cryptology to authroize transactions, make it unfeasible to compromise the system and allow one with the cryptologic code to have de facto ownship/authority over what is allocated to that key. To summarize what people aren't understanding is that: The bitcoin protocol makes it possible for people to exchange ownership and also have de facto ownership without conceding anything in between. Furthermore, bitcoin is objective or neutral, in that the bitcoin protocol can't cherry pick which transactions to let through and which ones not to, Everything gets processed the same. No one can sieze your funds, counterfiet you funds, forge ownership, or control your funds. This all assuming you are using bitcoins how they are meant to be used and protecting your private keys accordingly, which is another debate, but the fact that such an arrangement is even feasible is something that immediately makes bitcoin groundbreaking. other things to keep in mind

1. He who has the private keys, has the funds. No questions asked. You can't forge funds or delete funds, you can only lose access too funds. All the private keys thrown away aren't exactly deleted, its just noone has access to them. If you were to miraculously guess the private key to the wallets that have been discarded, you would have control over those funds. Unlike cash which can be counterfeited or destroyed.

2. Net neutrality as mentioned above. No single transaction is cherry picked or stopped, all transactions flow as normal whether they be thousands of bitcoins or a handful of satoshis.

3. You and conclusively verify an addresses fund without have access to the funds. this is groundbreaking. You don't have to trust in a third party to audit, or the trustworthiness of the person. It is literally impossible to game or scam the system, and if you manage to (i.e. break the cryptology) ether the funds become worthless, or the network agrees on a new cryptology to use.

essentially bitcoin makes it possible for people to exchange ownership of funds ( or anything once new things get built on top of the bitcoin network) in a conclusive manner without needing anyone else to clear the funds. A huge amount of society's efforts on the economic front have come from deciding who is credit worthy and who isn't, who is trustworthy, protecting assets and liabilties against fraud and cooking the books, and of course accounting for the risks, costs, and labor associated with moving, reconciling and clearing transactions. on top of all that, the consumer as of late has been the one to pay the price. as having gold or massive amounts of dollars is cumbersome, risky, and a cost in an of itself which can require massive amounts of correction, proviing ownership and such, bitcoins quite frankly just work. they cut the middle man and give power no to the people, as some revolutionaries say, but to no one and everybody at the same time. It is like a market-version of democracy, instead of a representative version. no one concedes their decision making, but rather in aggregate decide which paths to take, and since everyone benefits by having nobody have complete control, everyone decides that nobody should have control.

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