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A Somewhat Balanced View on School and Dropping Out

I dropped out of school during my sophomore year of college. I was a little bit scared to do it, but I followed through because I was certain that I didn't want to get a normal job or do anything else that would make use of a degree. Dropping out was one of the best decisions I've made, and it pushed me towards the life that I really wanted to live.

However, just because dropping out was right for me doesn't mean that it's right for everyone, or for you. I think that the school system is trending towards obsolescence and is a far worse value proposition that it was in previous eras, but that doesn't mean that it's worthless or that it's not the right choice for a lot of people. You might be surprised to find out that when people email me to ask if they should drop out, I tell many of them that I think they should stay in school.

When I talk about dropping out of school, by the way, I mean dropping out of college. Unless you are home schooled or have a very good plan for learning useful life and social skills, I think that at least completing high school is a good idea. I also think that taking some college is a good idea for many people. Going for a semester is a fairly small investment of time to figure out if it's a good fit for you, and you can also completely disregard course guidelines and take interesting things like Chinese and scuba diving.

If you're in high school or entering college, the most important thing you should realize is that you alone are responsible for your education and your life, and that you should use the next four years in the best way possible. Forget about labels like graduate and dropout, and focus on what is best going to prepare you for the life that you want to have.

What I’m Doing Now

On Ideas

From February to late March my life mostly consisted of being online all day everyday. I was making money with a method one of my friends recommended me and it was going well. I would say it was around 30 dollars an hours when you factor in how much flexibility and little effort was involved, even though I was technically online 12 hours a day, a lot of it was spent multi-tasking in between netflix and messing around. I could’ve cashed out with a lot more, but due to circumstances I didn’t. C’est la vie. Now that the method is gone, for the past couple of days I’ve been thinking about what to do, what to pursue as my next side-venture and I’m using this blog to outline my thinking process using tips I’ve learned from countless books and bloggers.

First some groundwork: What am I doing know? why? and what do I want to do? why?

1. I don’t really know why I go to college other than the fact that its costing me barely anything and having a degree could be good back up for teaching English abroad and getting into internships. I’ve posted before how I don’t really like college. Other than the social aspect and the occasional ambitious people you meet. The majority of people are kind of lost and just following the crowd. It reminds me of a line I read in Education of Millionaires where, while most of these people are in college they are creative, free and go-getters, but then when graduation comes around they settle into their business suits and take on an office job. I don’t want to be this person.

Yet at the same time I feel college is giving me borrowed time to act. At times I feel like I’m not completely utilizing time, but that has changed drastically in the past year and I am doing the things I want to do more than ever. In the end, unless I really make a lot of money or find an idea I am insanely passionate about and a way to pursue it without spending to much money, I will probably remain in college.

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