hide

Read Next

Island Adventure 2, Part 1: Total Disaster

As I write this, I am hunched over my laptop, which is held at an awkward angle because of the steering wheel in front of me. Carpal tunnel syndrome is imminent. Out of the window to my left, if it wasn't so foggy and dark, I'd be able to see our island. This island trip has not gone according to plan.

I had the not-so-genius-in-retrospect idea of driving through the night to Nova Scotia. I argued that we could each drive three hours or so, sleep six, and we'd arrive in the morning ready to tackle the day. That's not how things turned out, though.

From Boston, I drove us to the Canadian border. Exhausted, I turned the reins over to Ben. Ben continued my proud tradition of maintaining around 100mph (great roads, no cops), which came to an abrupt end a couple hours into his shift when he hit the biggest pothole I've ever seen. At 100mph. The tire popped and was completely shredded by the time we came to a stop in the shoulder.

Our rental vehicle, a faux-luxury Buick Verona, which we had been upgraded to, does have a spare, but it's a tiny one that can only go 50mph. That sounds like a bad thing, and is indeed bad in many cases, but there turned out to be a silver lining. Brian took over the driving, set the cruise control to 50mph, and eventually fell asleep at the wheel. I woke up as our car was cruise-control guided into the median ditch.

Gas or Diesel for international overland travel?

On LifeWeTravel

This post was originally posted by me on a different blog on Nov 7, 2011:

This answer is from Janet & Tom, a couple traveling through Central & South America.  You can see their related post at ExpeditionPortal, as well as their website cataloging their travels through Africa and Latin America.

“Our decision to go with gasoline versus diesel was made when purchasing a land Cruiser for our Africa trip. We had planned to go with diesel but were unable to get an appropriate diesel vehicle so we went with gas. We actually found that gas was a better choice for a number of reasons. Yes it is often more expensive however it is much more widely available in remote locations. We met travelers with diesel who occasionally were unable to get diesel as it is used by all truckers, however we never ever had problems getting gas. The mechanics are also more likely to be able to fix a gasoline engine versus a diesel engine. We have heard of travelers in South America having issues with water in the diesel, we met German travelers with diesel and they had problems with high altitude and cold.

We have had no issues with power and our highest altitude was 5000metres in Bolivia. Haven driven over 80,000km in Africa and 50,000km in the Americas we can honestly say that we have had no real issues. The octane in Egypt was horrible and we had to add additives but apart from that we have not had issues getting fuel or dirty fuel. We have been really impressed with the Nissan’s capabilities. There are more issues with dirty diesel than gasoline in some countries such as Bolivia. There are however many who travel with diesel vehicles we can only say that gasoline has not been a problem at all. We have also found that prices are not that different in many places.  As for performance at high altitudes, freezing temps or hot temps (57C Sahara) we have had no issues. We would choose gasoline again.

Rendering New Theme...