hide

Read Next

Living in a Small RV: Electricity

This is a continuation of the Living in a Small RV series. It will be a bit boring for anyone who isn't interested in solar power, but I wanted to write it like this because I had a tough time finding all of this information tied together.

There are two classes of devices in an RV that need electricity, AC and DC. The DC ones run off the battery and these include things like lights, the water pump, the vent fan(s), and anything you can plug into a 12v socket.

The AC ones are primarily the air conditioner and the microwave. They get their power from either plugging the RV in to a campsite or 120v socket at a house or by running the generator.

You better not leave for your trip without these items...

On William Hallman

There are a few different type of travel nomadics, those who have a home base and travel frequently from there (many vacations/work trips or taking 6 months on the road and then spend 6 months at home), the few who do long term frequent travel from city to city or country to country for a period of time like Ralf Potts from Vagabonding, or those in my group. I don’t really have a home base, I don’t have an apartment or a condo somewhere, at least not at this time, that I can come back to and reset. I don’t have a living room, bedroom or anything (Okay, technically I do, but I don't like to talk about it, I like to pretend I don't, okay? So just leave it like that and stop asking questions haha). I have a small storage unit, and a number of couches or guest rooms I can crash at when I spend time visiting my home city of Phoenix, Arizona.

I know what you’re thinking, no I’m not homeless (although the more I travel the more I seem to be getting comfortable with the nomadic lifestyle of the homeless…). I live in a nice condo, in San Francisco currently (though Los Angeles when I started this blog post), and I’ll be here for a total of 3 months. After that, I may stay in San Francisco another 3 months, or I may go somewhere else, like Seattle, or Austin. I don’t really know right now and I don’t really care.

I happen to know a number of people that live a similar lifestyle, surprisingly enough, and if you’re reading this, please share your tricks and essentials to traveling in the comments below. Many of my associates though do have a home base, they’ll travel off to work for a few months or weeks and then come home and work for a few months. I like that, but I also like whats going on with my life right now. It’s a bit chaotic at times, and takes a lot of adapting, but when you’re not really tied to a specific house or specific job institution and company you really learn to rely on yourself and it develops a confidence in traveling or surviving anywhere.

After doing this for a while, and running into the same problems or scenarios , you learn to pack relatively light. Everything I travel with fits in the back of a small car, or in my case, my Jeep. I’m gone far too long to want to just carry everything in one bag, but not long enough to move furniture or bring many books with me. Certain things I buy when I show up, and some things I take with me because I’m tired of purchasing it or finding it each time (like spices), and some things depend on how far and how long I’m traveling.

No matter how goofy or quirky, or seemingly small, I’m going to share some of my Intermediate Travel Tricks. Some I’ve learnt from being minimalist and taking other’s advice when traveling to other countries with only one bag and some are better for this who travel for a few months at a time to one location.

Rendering New Theme...