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Mopeds: The Urban Loophole Vehicles

I love San Francisco so much that it's almost a problem. When I think about taking a trip somewhere, my next thought is, "yeah, but there's so much awesome stuff going on right here, too." Of course, no city is perfect. San Francisco's faults are common to most big cities: parking is a pain traffic gets unwieldy during rush hour.

Enter the moped. I used to think that "moped" was another name for scooter, but it's not. Considering that mopeds, with a few exceptions, haven't been mass produced since the 1980s, it's not all that surprising that no one knows what they are anymore.

A moped is actually a hybrid between a small motorcycle and a bicycle. They were originally designed for the motors to assist in pedaling, not to completely take over. As small engines became more powerful the need for human power diminished and eventually they were replaced with scooters.

Context is Everything: A Tale of Two Beaches

On Made of Metaphors

[Sorry for the post delay and the switch to photographs for this one. I'm searchng for a better illustration method than the way I was previously drawing on my iPad, and anyway photos are more appropriate for this post anyhow.]

Both times I've been to Tonsai Beach I've gotten food poisoning.

This time I learned it has a name: Tonsai Belly. Food handling practices aren't up to Western standards, I guess. But then, neither are standards for garbage (most of it is burned in piles), water (bottled is the only fresh source), and lodging (most bathrooms are outdoors, hot water is a luxury.) The economy of Tonsai is so small that cash is a problem: the ATM dispenses thousand-baht notes, and most food and drink is tens of baht. There are maybe thirty stores total on the entire beach, so there's not much commerce.

In spite of its challenges and small overall size, Tonsai has two things in abundance: rock, and people who climb it.

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